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Skin Protection During The Summer Heat

For people in Miami, watching the NBA Miami Heat enter the play-offs is gratifying for defending our championship title from 2012.   Why is the Miami professional team called The Heat?  Urban legends are plentiful with the naming of our city’s NBA team franchise in 1988 but “HEAT” was chosen from the contest submissions due to our warm climate. The summer heat of South Florida means scorching temperatures starting now so that you’ll want these important skincare protection tips from Dr. Joukar at the RiteCare Medical Center. <h2″>Sun Block and Sun Screen? Are they the same? Both sunscreen and sun block provide protection against the sun. Sunscreen, the more commonly used type of sun protection, filters or screens the sun’s damaging rays of Ultraviolet A and B (UVA and UVB) — keeping most rays out, but letting some in. On the other hand, sun block physically reflects the sun’s rays from the skin, blocking the rays from penetrating the skin. Choosing between the two is a matter of personal preference and necessity. As long as you choose an SPF (sun protection factor) of 30, the current recommendation from the American Academy of Dermatologists, you are providing adequate protection for your skin.   If you are concerned about sun-related damage, visit your RiteCare physician right away. What brand of sun protection is best? The brand name matters much less than how often you apply the product. In general, look for water-resistant, broad-spectrum coverage with an appropriate SPF —to avoid sun-related damage like premature wrinkles or skin cancer later on in life. Check the expiration date, and follow the directions on the label. Also, keep in...

Should I worry about my fever?

A fever (higher than 98.6 F) means your body has something unusual going on.  But the degree of fever doesn’t necessarily indicate the seriousness of the underlying condition.  A minor illness may cause a high fever, and a more serious illness may cause a low fever. For very young children and infants, a slightly elevated temperature may indicate a serious infection.    For an adult, a fever may be uncomfortable, but your fever usually isn’t dangerous unless it reaches 103 F or higher. When should I see a doctor? Fevers may not be a cause for alarm — or a reason to call a doctor. Yet there are some circumstances when you should seek medical advice for your baby, your child or yourself. Call your child’s doctor if your child: Is listless or irritable, vomits repeatedly, has a severe headache or stomachache, or has any other symptoms causing significant discomfort. Ask your child’s doctor for guidance in special circumstances, such as a child with immune system problems or with a pre-existing illness. Your child’s doctor also may recommend precautions if your child has just started taking a new prescription medicine. Call your own doctor if you as an adult has: A  temperature higher than 103 F You’ve had a fever for more than three days High fever and symptoms like those below, call your doctor right away Severe headache Severe throat swelling Unusual skin rash, especially if the rash rapidly worsens Unusual sensitivity to bright light Stiff neck and pain when you bend your head forward Mental confusion Persistent vomiting Difficulty breathing or chest pain Extreme listlessness or irritability Abdominal pain...

Safer Sun through Self-Tanning

Living in South Florida is a sun-bathing temptation any day of the week.  Avoid UV tanning and consider self-tanning, a far safer and sunless option when compared to permanent skin damage with direct exposure from our Miami sun. Getting Your Glow For many, the golden skin tone from sun tanning makes us look better and feel healthier.  Being part of the smart generation using self-tanner products is a great way to avoid the sun’s harmful exposure to your skin.  You can smooth, swipe or spray on a light bronze glow for a deep, dark tan which dries in less than 45 minutes to one hour.  Many runway models and movie celebrities like Nicole Kidman are avoiding the sun all together to avoid permanent skin damage and delay premature wrinkles later on.    “Sunless tanning is much safer,” says Hossein Joukar, M.D., “and far better for any skin type, including those people with naturally darker tones.” According to the American Academy of Dermatology, the most effective products available are sunless or self-tanning lotions that contain dihydroxyacetone (DHA) as the active ingredient. This ingredient will change the color of your skin; it usually lasts about five to seven days from the initial application. DHA does offer some protection, equivalent to an SPF of about 2 to 4, simply not enough protection according to dermatology experts. When walking outside during sunlight hours, you will need to protect your skin from the sun. The daily dose of Vitamin D, captured in our skin by the UVB rays from the sun, delivers beneficial exposure at 5 – 10 minutes per day.   But be sure to apply a sunscreen with a...

Malaria Prevention

When summer vacation starts in Miami, many families visit Latin America since the children are out of school.  Do you know your ABCDs?   With these 4 simple reminders from The World Health Organization, you can prevent malaria while traveling abroad. Understand A B C D in advance of your trip: Awareness Bite prevention about mosquitoes Caution to take medication exactly as prescribed to prevent infection Diagnose and treat infection promptly 1.  Awareness – is Malaria in your region? The CDC has a general map of locations where malaria prevention is needed when traveling.  Better still, a visit with a travel medicine physician can help determine your risk based on your family’s travel plans. 2.  Fight the Bite – clothing and Rx prevention Mosquitoes that carry malaria typically bite between dusk and dawn.   Avoid outdoor evening exposure but if you must, wear long sleeves and long pants made of cotton fabric and use insect repellents with 30% DEET or 20% Picardin. 3.  Caution about your medication Most physicians will want to prescribe a medication dose which is precisely right for you.   Your expert in travel medicine will match the medication to your specific situation. 4.  Diagnosis – watch for warning signs Your symptoms may not appear right away but if you develop a fever, chills, sweats, fatigue, nausea, headaches and/or body aches, visit a doctor immediately and request a blood test. Interested in more information? Contact our urgent care clinics for expert medical...

Pre-diabetes Prevention

Those extra servings of pastelitos are delicious but may add unnecessary sugar and fat to your diet over time.   Yes, we love them.   Yes, they are best warm from the oven.   But if you are over 40, high sugar in your diet and you might become pre-diabetic, an early stage of diabetes. Pre-diabetes means you have blood glucose levels that are higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. Glucose comes from the foods we eat. Too much glucose in your blood can damage your body over time which increases your health risk at cardiovascular disease by 50%.   Particularly around the holidays when sweets are plentiful, try your best to avoid sugar-loaded foods. Most people with pre-diabetes don’t have any symptoms which is troubling. Your doctor can test your blood to find out if your blood glucose levels are higher than normal, something you would want to know. Nearly 41 million Americans are classified as “pre diabetic” after the age of 40 and over. If you are overweight and 40 years old or older, your doctor may recommend that you be tested for pre-diabetes. Here are a couple of healthy tips to help prevent diabetes for active adults, courtesy of our board-certified physicians at our Urgent Walk in Centers in greater Miami. Keep your weight under control.   If you lose at least 5 to 10 percent if overweight, then you can prevent or delay diabetes or even reverse pre-diabetes. That’s 10 to 20 pounds for someone who weighs 200 pounds. You can lose weight by cutting down on the amount of calories and fat you eat plus get...

Planning an international trip? Here’s what vaccines you should get!

Vaccines – Single Dose Shots Tetanus, hepatitis A, typhoid, and polio are all single-dose vaccines. However, if you are leaving soon, your body might not have time to develop protection after the shot, so you should follow your doctor’s advice for reducing your risk of these diseases. Yellow fever vaccine and meningococcal vaccine are also single-dose vaccines. Proof of yellow fever vaccination is required to enter many countries, and to enter Saudi Arabia, proof of meningococcalvaccine is required for people performing Hajj (personal pilgrimage to Mecca).   Keep in mind that proof is valid after 10 days from injection of the vaccine. Vaccines – Multiple Dose Shots Hepatitis B vaccine requires multiple doses but has an accelerated schedule (more doses given in a shorter period of time) which may be completed before your trip. Japanese encephalitis vaccines require multiple doses and do not have accelerated schedules. If Japanese encephalitis vaccine is recommended and you cannot get all the doses, your doctor may recommend taking steps to avoid mosquito bites. Rabies is a full series of vaccines.  If you cannot complete the multiple doses, it’s best to avoid all animals during your overseas trip and seek immediate medical care if you are...

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Hialeah, FL 33012
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